Ingredients

4 duck eggs
300g of black pudding, cut into rounds
6 slices of sourdough bread, large
120g of Le Gruyère AOP, grated
1 bunch of parsley, small and finely chopped
smoked paprika
salt
pepper
100ml of rapeseed oil, plus extra for frying

Serves

4

Method

A great recipe that can be eaten at any time of day. For breakfast, lunch or tea.  Combining the great taste of , combining earthy, mellow black pudding with crispy croutons and a wonderfully rich duck egg.

Food Urchin
1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4
2. First make your breadcrumbs, which can be made in advance and once done will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Tear your bread slices up into smaller pieces and place into a food processor
3. Pulse until you have a blend of fine crumbs, mixed in with larger, rougher lumps. I prefer this compared to going completely uniform with the crumbs
4. Place into a bowl and mix together with the rapeseed oil, adding a touch of salt and pepper for seasoning. Now scatter the crumbs onto a baking tray, making sure that everything isn’t clumped together and bake for 12-15 minutes, until they are all crunchy and golden.
5. Place a frying pan on the hob over a medium heat and add a small splash of oil. Add the black pudding rounds and move them around frequently
6. As they begin to cook, begin to break them up with a wooden spoon, so that you are left with more of a crumbly mix with large lumps and small. Cook through for 10 minutes and put to one side, keeping warm
7. Next, using another frying pan on the hob again over a medium-high heat, add a healthy splash of oil. You may need two pans, depending on the size of your pan, which means more washing up but what the hell. Crack your duck eggs in and fry until the albumen (egg whites) thicken and the edges begin to crisp
8. To plate up, scatter an even amount of breadcrumbs on the plate, along with an equal portion of black pudding. Sprinkle some of the parsley on top and then place your beautiful, quivering egg in the centre. Finish by sprinkling over a good handful of Gruyère ‘Reserve’ and if you want to make things extra fancy, dust the yolk with a smidgen of smoked paprika